Michaela  Morgan Psychology 

Mon-Fri 9-3pm

Mobile: 0406 633 991

FAQ - First Session

What should I bring to the first session?

Is there a waiting room?

What happens in the first session?

Is what I say confidential?

Q1/

What should I bring to the first session?

It is important to bring any referral letter to your first appointment unless it has been faxed directly by your GP beforehand. You will also need to bring you Medicare Card, means of payment (preferably EFTPOS card), and your Health Care or Pension Card if you intend to seek a concession/bulkbilling.  Please also bring (or email) copies of any previous cognitive assessments or reports, and any court orders which may be relevant.

Q2/

Is there a waiting room?

When you arrive you can enter through the left hand door into the waiting room where there are toilets, tea and coffee facilities as well as tv, toys and magazines in case you need to wait.

Q3/

What happens in the first session?

The first session will take approximately 90 minutes.  Prior to the session you will complete two forms – Client Registration (contact details) and Financial Agreement.  The session will then begin with an introduction and outline of the therapeutic process, including confidentiality, before spending the rest of the time outlining the presenting issues so that the session can conclude with a plan for any future therapy.

Q4/

Is what I say confidential?

Any information that identifies you or that you give to your psychologist must be treated with utmost privacy and respect. Information you provide in a psychology session will be held in the strictest confidence and generally will not be available to others, such as schools or other third-parties, without your written permission.

 

There are, however, legal limits to this confidentiality.  Brief feedback to your referring doctor is expected under Medicare funding.  A psychologist is also required to disclose information about you if it is demanded by law (subpoena), or if there is reasonable evidence to believe that someone is at risk of harm.  In the case of those under 18 years, Dr Morgan is a mandatory reporter and must inform the relevant authorities of any risk of harm.